TRISTAN BATES THEATRE – 2015

Inspired by Horvath’s Judgment Day, translated by Christopher Hampton.

1958, in a small town in the Lake District, railway stationmaster Thomas Price is the pillar of his local community.

But when a young woman unexpectedly arrives on the platform, his well-ordered life begins to unravel…


 

Book – Susannah Pearse

Music and Lyric – Tom Connor

Director – Bronagh Lagan

Musical Director – Caroline Humphris

Designer – Nik Corrall

Lighting Designer – Jon Stacey

Production Photography – Kim Sheard


 

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REVIEWS

“Wonderful to see a new British musical of such melodic depth & dramatic intensity as The Stationmaster beautifully staged by Bronagh Lagan – MARK SHENTON

 

“Returned to From Page To Stage today for The Stationmaster & had high expectations thrillingly exceeded” – TERRI PADDOCK

 

Excellent direction that gets the audience thinking. It is delivered by a great cast. The Stationmaster definitely deserves its place as the headline show for the ‘Page to Stage’ season.” **** – TERRY EASTHAM, LONDONTHEATRE1

 

“To see a fledgling musical like The Stationmaster find its feet and roar for the first time on a stage, in a theatre, is immensly gratifying…Skilfully staged against all the odds of this postage stamp space by Bronagh Lagan.” – EDWARD SECKERSON

 

“The not inconsiderable challenge faced by the creatives was to add to it by transforming it into a musical – and I’m delighted to say that I believe they have met that challenge magnificently.” – BROADWAYWORLD

 

There’s a three-way battle of conscience versus duty versus a self-preservation instinct (with forbidden love trying to get a sneaky kick in too) and the tension created gives the work its strong dramatic intrigue…if this is what new musical Theatre writing in the UK looks like, it’s on solid footing” – BARGAIN THEATRE LAND

 

“Fear not! New musical theatre writing is alive and well” – AURA SIMON, MUSICAL THEATRE REVIEW ****

 

“Bronagh Lagan’s direction works wonders in the intimate space of the Tristan Bates, Nik Corrall’s set working in expressionistic detail alongside a nice range of cakes, and there’s strong work from a multi-roling ensemble” – OUGHT TO BE CLOWNS